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What Are the Fair Hiring Practices and Job Discrimination Laws for Employers?

What Are the Fair Hiring Practices and Job Discrimination Laws for Employers?

As an employer, it is important to understand what practices are fair in hiring employees under federal law.  Federal law dictates equal opportunity for employees.

 

Here’s an overview of some key employment discrimination laws:

 

  • Title VII of the Civil rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.

  • The Equal Pay act of 1963 protects men and women who perform substantially equal work in the same establishment from sex-based wage discrimination.

  • The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 protects individuals 40 or older.

  • Title I and V of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 prohibit employment discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities in the private sector, and in state and local governments.

  •  Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities who work in the federal government.

  • Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 prohibits employment discrimination based on genetic information about an applicant, employee, or former employee.

  • The Civil Rights Act of 1991 provides monetary damages in cases of intentional employment discrimination.

 

Where Can I Find More Information ABout Employment Law?

 

You can find more information on job discrimination laws at the U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission website.

 

Please note, these federal laws not only apply to the hiring process, but termination and harassment in the workplace.  They also encompass any classification of employees, advertisements, recruiting, or testing.

 

 

How Can I Ensure My Business Follows Regulations?

 

It’s often said that ignorance of the law is no excuse for breaking it, furthermore, awareness of these laws can go a long way to ensure their followed. Consider outlining your company policies in an employee handbook as a way to communicate these guidelines to your employees.