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Divorce and Legal Separation

Divorce Documents and Filing Information

For No-Fault Divorce papers and instructions on filing in each of the United States, please click here and select your state. For help articles on Read more...

Legal Name Change

If you need information regarding a Legal Name Change, please click here. Read more...

Can I call Rocket Lawyer for legal advice?

No. We provide do-it-yourself services for consumers and small businesses, but if you have specific legal questions, we can connect you with a lawyer. If Read more...

Michigan No-Fault Divorce

Michigan is a purely no-fault divorce state, meaning that there is no need to prove grounds (like adultery or impotence) in order to get a divorce.  Read more...

Arkansas No-Fault Divorce

Arkansas is not a no-fault divorce state: this means the parties must have grounds (a valid reason according to the state) to request the divorce.  Read more...

How to File for an Uncontested or No Fault Divorce

A no-fault divorce is not the same as an uncontested divorce. A no-fault divorce refers to the grounds for the divorce-- typically separation, Read more...

Divorce by Publication

What if you want a divorce, but don't know where your spouse is? To learn more, please click here. Read more...

Mississippi No-Fault Divorce

Mississippi provides both fault and no-fault grounds for divorce. The no-fault ground is simply, "irreconcilable differences". To learn more, Read more...

Georgia No-Fault Divorce

In the state of Georgia there are 13 grounds for divorce. One of these is "irretrievably broken [marriage]", or the no-fault ground.  To Read more...

How Does Divorce Affect Child Health Insurance?

What if Neither Spouse Has Group Coverage? If neither you nor your spouse has access to group coverage than you’ll need to agree how you’ll be Read more...

What's the Difference Between a Fault and No Fault Divorce?

What’s the Difference Between a Fault and No Fault Divorce? The difference between a fault and a no fault divorce is the grounds for the divorce. In Read more...

Legal Name Change in Texas after Divorce

To get a legal name change after divorce in Texas, please click here.  Read more...

Legal Name Change in Illinois after Divorce

To get a legal name change after divorce in Illinois, please click here. Read more...

Washington DC No-Fault Divorce

The District of Columbia offers no-fault divorces, meaning the court will not assign fault to either party. D.C. law states that one party must allege Read more...

South Dakota No-Fault Divorce

The State of South Dakota offers a no fault divorce based on irreconcilable differences. Irreconcilable differences can only be used as a grounds for Read more...

South Carolina No-Fault Divorce

South Carolina grants both fault and no-fault divorces. If a spouse believes that the marriage should end on the grounds of adultery, alcoholism, physical Read more...

Oklahoma No-Fault Divorce

Oklahoma is one of few states that still maintains fault grounds for divorce, though it also essentially grants no-fault divorces on the grounds of " Read more...

Legal Name Change in Pennsylvania after Divorce

To get a legal name change after divorce in Pennsylvania, please click here.  Read more...

Legal Name Change in Florida after Divorce

Here's how get a legal name change after divorce in Florida. To learn more, please click here. Read more...

Indiana No-Fault Divorce

Indiana offers both fault and no-fault divorces. A fault divorce places blame on either party, and can only be considered if one spouse believes that Read more...

Colorado No-Fault Divorce

The State of Colorado refers to divorce as a "dissolution of marriage", and is a purely no-fault divorce state, meaning the court will not Read more...

How Divorce Affects your IRAs and Employer-provided Retirement Plans

Your Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO) will address how the divorce affects your IRAs and employer-provided retirement plans.    What is Read more...

Division of Property in a Divorce

If you are getting a divorce, it's best when you can decide with your spouse on the division of property rather than let the court take control. To Read more...

Choosing Legal Separation or Divorce - Common Situations

Choosing between legal separation and a divorce is often a difficult decision.  Click here for a list of common reasons that couples often Read more...

Legal Name Change in New York after Divorce

To get a legal name change after divorce in New York, please click here.  Read more...

Legal Name Change in California after Divorce

To get a legal name change in California after you have divorced, please click here to learn your next steps.  Read more...

Wyoming No-Fault Divorce

The State of Wyoming is a no-fault divorce state, meaning the court will not assign fault to either party for the divorce. Wyoming uses irreconcilable Read more...

Wisconsin No-Fault Divorce

The State of Wisconsin is a no-fault divorce state, meaning the court will not assign fault to either party for the divorce.  To learn more, please Read more...

West Virginia No-Fault Divorce

In order to be granted a no-fault divorce in the state of West Virginia, a couple must state grounds, or terms that qualify them for said divorce. The two Read more...

Washington No-Fault Divorce

The state of Washington is a purely no-fault divorce state. Its system is intended to settle matters without resentment and bitterness. Washington's Read more...

Virginia No-Fault Divorce

In the state of Virginia, there are several grounds for divorce. The 5th ground, `living apart` is considered the no-fault ground. To learn more, please Read more...

Vermont No-Fault Divorce

The State of Vermont offers no-fault divorces, where one party alleges that the marriage is `irretrievably broken` (commonly known as irreconcilable Read more...

Utah No-Fault Divorce

Utah offers both fault and no-fault divorces; the no-fault grounds are irreconcilable differences or three years of consecutive non-cohabitation.  To Read more...

Texas No-Fault Divorce

The state of Texas allows both fault and no-fault grounds for divorce.  To learn more, please click here.    Read more...

Tennessee No-Fault Divorce

Tennessee offers both fault and no-fault divorces. In order to file for a no-fault divorce, the couple must state that there are "irreconcilable Read more...

Rhode Island No-Fault Divorce

The State of Rhode Island offers a no-fault divorce based on irreconcilable differences. To learn more, please click here.  Read more...

Pennsylvania No-Fault Divorce

The State of Pennsylvania offers two types of no-fault divorce. A "mutual consent divorce" can be granted ninety days after filing for divorce Read more...

Oregon No-Fault Divorce

Oregon is a purely no-fault divorce state, which means that a couple does not need to prove grounds for the divorce, other than "irreconcilable Read more...

Ohio No-Fault Divorce

No-fault divorce in Ohio works very similarly to a fault divorce in that most of the procedures are the same. To receive a divorce from someone living in Read more...

North Dakota No-Fault Divorce

A no-fault divorce can be obtained relatively quickly in the state of North Dakota as long as both parties are in agreement to the terms of the divorce. Read more...

North Carolina No-Fault Divorce

The State of North Carolina still requires grounds for divorce, but they do offer one no-fault ground: `one-year separation`. If any other reason is Read more...

New York No-Fault Divorce

New York State is not a No-Fault Divorce State, because certain grounds for divorce are required.  However, recent changes in State law now include Read more...

New Mexico No-Fault Divorce

New Mexico offers both fault and no-fault divorces. In order to receive a no-fault divorce, the filing spouse must state their grounds for filing as Read more...

New Jersey No-Fault Divorce

In the state of New Jersey, you can file for divorce on several grounds: adultery, extreme cruelty, desertion, and no-fault. No-fault divorce means the Read more...

New Hampshire No-Fault Divorce

The state of New Hampshire offers no-fault divorces, where one party alleges that the marriage is `irretrievably broken` (commonly known as irreconcilable Read more...

Nevada No-Fault Divorce

Nevada provides two no-fault divorce grounds: incompatibility, and living separately and apart. To learn more, please click here. Read more...

Nebraska No-Fault Divorce

Nebraska offers a no-fault ground for divorce, for cases in which there is an irretrievable breakdown of the marriage.  To learn more, please click Read more...

Montana No-Fault Divorce

No-fault divorces are recognized by the State of Montana.  One party must allege that the marriage is `irretrievable breakdown`.   To learn more, Read more...

Missouri No-Fault Divorce

Missouri is a purely no-fault divorce state, meaning that there is no need to provide grounds for the dissolution of the marriage.  To learn more, Read more...

Minnesota No-Fault Divorce

Minnesota is a purely no-fault divorce state, which means that neither party must find grounds for divorce, rather, the couple can get a divorce on the Read more...

Massachusetts No-Fault Divorce

The State of Massachusetts is a purely no-fault divorce state, meaning the court will not assign fault to either party for the divorce if a no-fault Read more...

Maryland No-Fault Divorce

In order to file for a divorce in the state of Maryland, the spouses must have grounds or reason to do so, which must have occurred in Maryland, or else Read more...

Maine No-Fault Divorce

No-fault divorces are recognized by the State of Maine.  One party must allege that the marriage is `irretrievably broken`.  This is commonly Read more...

Louisiana No-Fault Divorce

Louisiana offers both fault and no-fault divorces. In order to be granted a no-fault divorce a couple must live separately for two years or more. In Read more...

Kentucky No-Fault Divorce

Kentucky is a no-fault divorce state, however, a divorce is not granted until the couple has lived apart for at least 60 days prior to the filing for Read more...

Kansas No-Fault Divorce

The State of Kansas still requires grounds for divorce, but does offer one no-fault ground: "incompatibility". To learn more, please click here. Read more...

Iowa No-Fault Divorce

Iowa is a purely no-fault divorce state, meaning a divorce may be granted if the couple agrees that there has been a breakdown of the marriage Read more...

Illinois No-Fault Divorce

Illinois allows both fault and no-fault grounds for divorce. The no-fault grounds for divorce are based on the couple living separate and apart for a Read more...

Idaho No-Fault Divorce

The State of Idaho offers no-fault divorces. In order to file for divorce, one party must allege that the marriage is `irretrievably broken` (commonly Read more...

Hawaii No-Fault Divorce

The State of Hawaii offers no-fault divorces, meaning the court will not assign fault to either party.  To learn more, please click here.    Read more...

Florida No-Fault Divorce

The State of Florida is a purely no-fault divorce state, meaning the court will not assign fault to either party for the divorce. Florida law states that Read more...

Delaware No-Fault Divorce

The State of Delaware recognizes no-fault divorces. Delaware permits several grounds for filing a no-fault divorce such as incompatibility between the Read more...

Connecticut No-Fault Divorce

The State of Connecticut still requires that a couple find grounds or reason for a divorce. However, Connecticut does offer a no-fault grounds for divorce: Read more...

California No-Fault Divorce

The State of California is a purely no-fault divorce state, meaning the court will not assign fault to either party for the divorce.  To learn more, Read more...

Arizona No-Fault Divorce

Arizona is a purely no-fault divorce state, which means that neither spouse has to prove blame or responsibility to end the marriage.  To learn more, Read more...

Alaska No-Fault Divorce

The State of Alaska recognizes no-fault divorces where one party alleges that `incompatibility of temperament has caused the irremediable breakdown of the Read more...

Alabama No-Fault Divorce

No-fault divorces are recognized by the State of Alabama.  One party must allege that the marriage is `irretrievably broken`.  This is commonly Read more...

Difference Between a Fault and No Fault Divorce

The difference between a fault and a no fault divorce is the grounds for the divorce. In the first case, the spouse filing the divorce claims the other Read more...

Choosing Legal Separation or Divorce - Common Situations

What Is Legal Separation? With a legal separation married individuals remain married under the law but opt to live separately--just as with an informal Read more...